Mark Boland, Fair Winds and Following Seas...

Discussion in 'Ground Commands, Stations, & Bases' started by 25Kingman49, Jan 27, 2016.

  1. 25Kingman49

    25Kingman49 Well-Known Member

    It is my sad duty to inform this AAF Forum membership of the passing of Mark J. Boland, our fellow member identification mbee53. Mark was a friend of mine for years with many off forum communications both thru email and phone. Mark was killed in a traffic accident outside of Fort Worth, Texas on Monday 23 November 2015, see http://www.star-telegram.com/news/local/community/fort-worth/article46264345.html

    Mark was a steadfast member nearly from the beginning of this AAF forum with a dedicated purpose in the study of the less published AAF Service and Ground Command entities during WW II.

    In the old AAF forum Mark was a vital member of the Ground Commands working group along with Bernie Shearon who now holds that study torch alone. Mark’s contribution here will not soon be forgotten, and hopefully in this forum reconstruction the reestablishment of Mark’s Ground Command posts will live on for some time to come, now without Mark’s updates.

    Mark was a United States Navy (USN) veteran. In Mark's own words Thursday 6 August 2012 5:52 PM:
    "I served on board two aircraft carriers during my 4 years. I was on the USS Wasp (CVS-18) from 1968-69, an old WWII carrier, converted for antisubmarine work. I started out as a machinist mate wanna be, then went to the deck department as a boatswain's mate. I ended up in the laundry division (S-3) and decided that was where I wanted to be. They did not see it that way as they transferred me to temporary duty at a Ships Serviceman's school in San Diego which would lead to assignment to the carrier Forestal (CVA-59). That plan did not go well, as me and my buddy (along with 75% of class) flunked this premier class. Honestly, we were having too much fun in California to study something we did not really care about. It was supposed to be a volunteer assignment, but I was never asked if I wanted to go.
    While on the Wasp, I went on two cruises, one to the Mediterranean and the other to the North Atlantic. We were also involved in a collision with a tanker while refueling on the way back from Gitmo. It was only minor damage, but the new captain got shipped out after an investigation.
    On to the Forrestal. I could not convince the Personnel Officer that I should go to the S-3 division, and he put me and my two friends from the Wasp in the Deck Department, and specifically the Boat Division. We did not have the certificate for passing the course, so they could put us anywhere they like. I eventually got transferred to S-3 division after about sixth months and was promoted to Petty Officer 3rd Class as a Ships Serviceman. I went on two more cruises to the Med on the Forrest Fire, and we went into dry dock in 1971. They let me out two months early, in Oct. 1971, and I was never so glad."


    USS Wasp (CVS-18) http://www.navsource.org/archives/02/18a.htm
    USS Forrestal (CVA-59) http://www.navsource.org/archives/02/59.htm
    See (CVA-59) 1971 cruise book page attached, source https://www.fold3.com/image/305607367

    After USN service Mark continued to serve the United States Government in varied positions including computer programming within the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), 1974-2007, retiring with 33 years of service.

    Wishing Mark Fair Winds and Following Seas to his next port of call, he will be sorely missed for his faithful contributions to this forum and to me personally.

    Mark J. Boland 5 April 1948 to 23 November 2015
     
    Last edited: Mar 21, 2016
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  2. Scott Burris

    Scott Burris Site Admin Staff Member

    Ah, sad to learn this. We had a few clashes over minor stuff, but his knowledge of and passion for the ground units was undeniable.
     
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  3. bernies

    bernies New Member

    He'll certainly be missed.
     
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  4. Mark was extremely influencial in expanding the subjrct areas of the old forum and especially in this area of domestic air and ground commands.

    I am saddened to hear of his loss. He was always willing to share is vast knowledge of the AAF.

    Farewell, Mark.
     

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