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B-25H Burma Mail.

Discussion in '341st BG' started by barneybolac, Oct 21, 2016.

  1. barneybolac

    barneybolac New Member

  2. JolietMark

    JolietMark New Member

    I believe the color is maybe a darker OD since the squadron insignia of the 490th is black and white and the color of the a/c is lighter. Just my opinion. Great image, thanks for posting,
    Mark
     
  3. tonystro

    tonystro Member

    Great captures from the film, Barney!! I agree with Mark about the paint color...standard OD. None of the 490th veterans I have been in contact with over the years ever mentioned a black plane, not even the 'night intruders' operated from Dec 44 thru Feb 45.

    This aircraft, B-25H-1 43-4577 was assigned to the 490th Bomb Squadron on 24 May 1944, no information regarding the disposition except that it was salvaged (date, place unknown).

    Commencing with January 15, the 490th in conjunction with the Psychological Warfare Division of the U.S. Office of War Information began flying one-plane leaflet dropping missions into enemy-held territory in northeastern and central Burma. These operations, nicknamed the "Burma Mail" by Squadron personnel, were carried out from January 15th through 6 April. More than 2 million leaflets and hundreds of 'gift packs' were dropped in the 47 missions completed before the 490th transferred to Hanchung, China in mid-April. 490th Bm Sq B-25H, 43-4493, was last contacted just after take off and failed to return from the mission of 17 Jan.

    Leaflets dropped were varied and intended to create a psychological reaction among the people of Burma and enemy troops that will aid the overall, Allied war effort. Some specially prepared material intended only for the Burmese -- others aimed only at the Japanese viewpoint. Among leaflets dropped were newspapers written in Kachin, Burmese and Shan, Battlefront News written in Japanese and intended for enemy troops, Japanese prisoner treatment leaflets, Jap surrender cards, news extras, several types of Japanese newspapers, and warnings to Burmese peoples regarding pending operations in their immediate localities. Some of the propaganda material illustrated. Also dropped were good-will sewing packs, matches and needles, a great shortage existing among the people of Burma.

    Most of the drops were directed along the Burma Road -- and other roads and hill villages northeast of Mandalay. Villages covered included Kutkai, Lashio, Loilem, Hsipaw, Mong Yai, Namhkai and Myitson. On many occasions villagers were seen to run out and gather up material dropped. Some was also found on the person of dead enemy troops-- prisoner-treatment leaflets and surrender cards in particular.

    An example of one of the cloth-based, needle "gift packs" dropped by "Burma Mail."

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    Last edited: Oct 21, 2016
    25Kingman49 likes this.
  4. barneybolac

    barneybolac New Member

    Thank you.
    You have all been very helpful.
     
  5. barneybolac

    barneybolac New Member

    While I am at it a few other images I have found online lately of the squadron.

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