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449th Fighter Squadron

Discussion in '51st FG' started by ktmahon, Apr 18, 2016.

  1. ktmahon

    ktmahon Member

    I was just about to post a photo of P-38s of the 449th, probably in Chengkung. You can see that the buzz number of my dad's airplane in 307.
     

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  2. ktmahon

    ktmahon Member

    Regarding the buzz number of my dad's airplane, I had wondered if the plane had survived after my dad left the theater in May of 1945. If you search for "449th Japanese surrender," you will find a video of a Japanese delegation that had flown from Hanoi to surrender to the US forces in Mengzi, China on 3 September 1945. P-38 number 307 is seen gear down on landing approach. This is probably the Eula D II. I am attaching a screen capture of the plane with number 307 clearly visible.
     

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  3. 25Kingman49

    25Kingman49 Well-Known Member

    For those who dislike note pad. Keith Mahon; It’s Us or Them PDF.

    449th Fighter Squadron, 14th Air Force footage of Japanese Surrender video.
     

    Attached Files:

    Last edited: May 28, 2016
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  4. ktmahon

    ktmahon Member

    Sorry about the .txt files. I have just acquired a free converter .doc-->.pdf. Will post attachments in .pdf going forward.
     
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  5. ktmahon

    ktmahon Member

    In written accounts of combat operations the interpersonal view is rarely addressed. I am attaching a story of one of my dad’s encounters with Claire Chennault. Hopefully, it will help those who are interested gain some understanding of Chennault’s focus on the human element when dealing with his personnel. These were men and women who suffered hardships due to the living conditions at most of the air fields and due to the shortage of supplies of every category. Chennault's down-to-earth, one-on-one approach when dealing with personnel of all ranks helped make him respected by most and revered by many.
     

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  6. ktmahon

    ktmahon Member

    Keith Mahon's hand drawn and hand colored version of the 449th FS insignia.
     

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  7. ktmahon

    ktmahon Member

    Photo of pilots of the 449th FS.
    Rear:
    Martin, Bledsoe, Masterson, Robinson, Mahon, Kelly, Moore, Harris, Wire
    Center:
    Chamberlin, Huber, Roll, Healy, Forsythe, Bartlett, Rogers, Weber
    Front:
    Pritchett, Mercer, Jones
     

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  8. ktmahon

    ktmahon Member

    The P-38 was one BIG fighter aircraft: 2 photos: Keith Mahon, Chungking.
     

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  9. ktmahon

    ktmahon Member

    In previous post I wrote "Chungking" as the location. Correct name is Chengkung.
     
  10. Rick Peck

    Rick Peck New Member

    Thank you for sharing. Some rare photo's , video and documents .
    Rick
     
  11. Airwar

    Airwar Well-Known Member

    Attached Files:

  12. ktmahon

    ktmahon Member

  13. ktmahon

    ktmahon Member

    Most of us, at one time or another, have used the expression, "It takes all kinds..." The personalities of fighter pilots in WWII varied greatly. There were those who were loud-mouthed glory seekers; those who were quiet, unassuming individuals and everything in between.

    The attached file tells a story about Charles Older, one of the quiet, unassuming types who had 18.25 aerial victories at war’s end.
     

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  14. ktmahon

    ktmahon Member

    Most of the military personnel who served in WWII got out of the service at war’s end. Some, like my dad, remained in service. Keith Mahon fought hard for a regular commission. He achieved his desire and had a 28-year military career. With your indulgence, I’m straying off of the topic of the USAAF in WWII by posting photos of my dad in uniform beginning with Aviation Cadets and ending with his receiving the Legion of Merit upon retirement. 1_1942.jpg 2_1943.jpg 9_1945.jpg 10_1945.jpg 11_1947.jpg 12_1960.jpg 13_1965.jpg 15_1965.jpg 16_date unknown.jpg 17_1970.jpg
     
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  15. ktmahon

    ktmahon Member

    Have not visited the forum for a while. Here is a photo of Keith Mahon in phase training. This could have been taken at
    Williams Field, Arizona or in San Diego or Muroc in California. mahon phase training.jpg
     
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  16. ktmahon

    ktmahon Member

    Keith Mahon, Art Masterson and Hank Rogers in front of Masterson's P-38. mahon masterson rogers.jpg
     
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  17. ktmahon

    ktmahon Member

    Hank Rogers, Keith Mahon and Art Masterson. rogers mahon masterson.jpg
     
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  18. ktmahon

    ktmahon Member

    A quote from the official 449th FS history about Art Masterson: "Capt. Masterson is credited with being the pilot who opened the Burma-Stillwell road."
     
  19. Airwar

    Airwar Well-Known Member

    Interesting story
     

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