42-37726 Shady Lady

Discussion in '305th BG - Chelveston' started by Ynkezfn, Apr 19, 2017.

  1. 25Kingman49

    25Kingman49 Well-Known Member

    Hmm, seems the OP deleted a post here regarding the origin of this picture. Maybe this thread is drawing to a close.

    Also of interest in this photo are the planes mission markings. Below the bomb missions is a row of about 10 Leaflet Drops, about a third of the way down this line (appears to be a photo censor blotch). If correct, wonder what was painted there that required censoring.
    Caulk Crew - Copy.jpg
    Caulk Crew - censor blotch.jpg
     
    Last edited: Apr 23, 2017
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  2. Ynkezfn

    Ynkezfn New Member

    I deleted the post out of respect for who sent me this picture. My family is looking for the original that hopefully isn't censored. From what I can see this picture is a different plane than the Shady Lady. The Shady Lady posted earlier in this post only has a few Leaflet missions on it and 10 times more bombing missions. From what I can tell be 801482.org website they flew in multiple planes while I'm guessing the Shady Lady was under repair after the June 22/23 flight over Rotterdam. The gentleman that gave me the picture is also in the AirWar StudyGroup. My apologies for deleting the post.

    Steve
     
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  3. 25Kingman49

    25Kingman49 Well-Known Member

    Steve,
    Above all else thank you for sharing your first name, good to make your acquaintance. No worries protecting sources, another of our major contributing members is Jaap Vermeer, also a member of the Netherlands Air War Study Group. Pretty sure the members of that group don't mind their names used if cited properly but better safe than sorry.

    Yes, pretty confident this is not Shady Lady and the scalloped (wavy black bottom paint scheme) seems unusual to me but I am a Carpetbagger novice of sorts, particularly with their Fort use.

    I asked our member Hal "Lucky Partners" if he could help to remove the crew identification arrows. I think he did a rather grand job, then I captioned it as I would for a Wendover Airfield Museum exhibit. Certainly not the original photograph you seek but hopefully acceptable for your collection.
    Scott

    Lewis J Caulk Crew with Caption.jpg
     
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  4. RSwank

    RSwank Well-Known Member

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  5. 25Kingman49

    25Kingman49 Well-Known Member

    Interesting, it does appear the serial number block has also been censored. Given the Carpetbagger missions were a combined AAF/OSS & UK SOE operation we are probably lucky that any of these photos even exist given their top secret nature at the time.
     
    Last edited: Apr 23, 2017
  6. Lucky Partners

    Lucky Partners Well-Known Member

    The 'blotch' that was being talked about above is the one in the area of the mission markers, not the s/n block. What is interesting about the s/n block is that it appears as if it was either covered up or painted over on the fuselage, not blocked out on the photo by a censor. Cannot imagine that a photo censor could do that good a job without taking out part of the man's head with it. Almost looks like there's a piece of paper taped over the s/n.

    EDIT:
    One other point that may clarify my logic. These crew shots were usually taken in groups. A photographer would set up in front of an available aircraft that was positioned right for the lighting. A crew would get into place, their picture taken, then they would move off. The next crew would move into place, their picture taken, then they would move off. Etc, etc, etc, until all the needed pictures had been taken. It would make a lot more sense to block out the s/n on the plane than to have to retouch all those individual photographs. I have seen groups of as many as 8 or 10 consecutive crew photos taken in a single setup.



    blotch.jpg
     
    Last edited: Apr 23, 2017
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  7. Ynkezfn

    Ynkezfn New Member

    Thank you for the picture and the information around it. It's amazing how much you can get out of one of these pictures. Thank you for sharing your knowledge.

    Steve
     
  8. terveurn

    terveurn Active Member

    couple points of interest in Caulk crew photo -- no check gun on the left side, but opening for the gun on the right. Also, for night opes, the black painted window frames on the navigators windows.

    Might be a late B-17F.
     
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  9. Lucky Partners

    Lucky Partners Well-Known Member

    Eagle eyes Dave! That little slice of light visable through the nose. I never gave it a thought, just figured it was something white in there. Good call.
     
  10. 25Kingman49

    25Kingman49 Well-Known Member

    My apologies to all. Hal "Lucky Partners" alerted me that the "new" Caulk Crew image had some loss in quality, I didn't notice because I'm blind. "Briefly", to add captions for the museum the photo is inserted in a Word Doc caption added, then converted to a PDF (no loss in image quality) and off for possessing by our photo lab. Here to create the JPG I printed the Word Doc then scanned it at 300 dpi. (way more than anyone wants to know)...

    So that everyone has the best quality image here is the photo as restored by Hal, caption added below. Also attached is the Word Doc image converted to PDF for your records. Sorry for this inconvenience and wasted space.

    C'est la vie,
    Scott

    Caulk Crew - restored.jpg
    Photo courtesy Netherlands Air War Study Group

    Lewis J. Caulk Crew
    Standing L-R: Ukn ground crew; 2nd Lt Raymond J Murray; 2nd Lt Lewis J Caulk; 2nd Lt Matthew M Vickovic; 2nd Lt Charles E Hurst; Ukn ground crew
    Kneeling L-R: S/Sgt Kenneth W Emens; Sgt Thomas N Jones; S/Sgt William T Dameron; Sgt Richard C Dickinson; Sgt Harvis H Brady; Sgt Marion K Mason

    S/Sgt Kenneth W Emens
    SSgt Kenneth W Emens.jpg
     

    Attached Files:

    Last edited: Apr 25, 2017
  11. Ynkezfn

    Ynkezfn New Member

    Wow!! Thanks for all this. Great picture with a ton of information about it.
     
  12. greg

    greg New Member

  13. terveurn

    terveurn Active Member

    305th BG night mods 1943

    305th BG mods night mods.JPG
     
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  14. RSwank

    RSwank Well-Known Member

    Interesting list of modifications. I think I can identify most of them but I could be wrong. ;-)

    SBA sets (Standard Beam Approach) was the blind landing system used by the RAF and 8th AF. GEE was a navigation system. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gee_(navigation)

    DR (Distance Reading) Compasses were RAF developed compasses that had a gyro/magnetic unit in the tail of the aircraft (away from magnetic disturbances) and repeater (read out) units for the pilot and navigator.

    The Astrograph can be read about here. An interesting device.

    https://cdn.shopify.com/s/files/1/1..._Compasses_Flux_Gate_Sextants_Driftmeters.pdf

    Astro Compass here: http://aafcollection.info/comm/2013/02/05/the-astro-compass/

    Flame suppressors were for the engine exhausts. Flash eliminators were cone shaped devices on the end of the barrels of the 50 cal guns. The idea was to shield the gunners eyes from the flash so he would not lose his night vision.

    Sight modifications probably added low intensity lights so the gun sight could be seen and used at night.

    I think the manual cut-off for the waist guns prevented the waist gun from swinging over to fire at the wing (or tail) of the plane. There already were cams in the top and ball turrets which prevented them from firing at the plane, but the waist guns were normally "free swinging". Most of the other items seem to be self explanatory. The resin lights were (I think) the "blue" night lights on the trailing edge of the wing. Common in RAF aircraft. Used at night over England.

    Not sure about the three tail bombing lights. Originally, there were lights in the tail of a B-17 F which where used for various signaling purposes. With the installation of the Cheyenne Tail guns the lights may have been eliminated. As a guess, they may have used the lights over England so they would not get shot down by Allied night fighters.
     
    Last edited: May 16, 2017

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